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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in sun protection

This Desert HEAT is NO JOKE!! Here is a video with some helpful information to keep in mind!!! Please drink lots of water and stay HYDRATED!! Keep our elderly SAFE & COOL. Hope you all have a BEAUTIFUL DAY!

 

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Posted by on in Senior Health

USE OF SUNSCREEN

Sunscreen is a product that you put on your skin to protect it from the sun's UV rays. But it is important to know that sunscreen is just a filter-it does not block all UV rays.

Sunscreens are available in many forms-lotions, creams, ointments, gels, sprays, wipes and lip balms to nae a few.

Some cosmetics, such as moisturizers, lipsticks and foundations are considered sunscreen products if they have sunscreen. Some makeup contains sunscreen, but you have to check the label-makeup, including lipstick, without sunscreen does not provide protection.

READ LABELS

When choosing a sunscreen product, be sure to read the label. Sunscreens with broad spectrum protection (against both UVA and UVB rays) and with sun protection factor (SPF) values of 30 or higher are recommended.

Sun protection factor (SPF): The SPF number is the level of protection the sunscreen provides against UVB rays, which are the main cause of sunburn. A higher SPF number means more UVB protection.

Sunscreens labeled with SPF's as high as 100+ are available. Higher numbers do mean more protection, but many people don't understand the SPF scale. SPF 15 sunscreens filter out about 93% of UVB rays, while SPF 30 sunscreens filter out about 97%, SPF 50 sunscreens about 98%, and SPF 100 about 99%. No sunscreen protects you completely.

Sunscreens with an SPF lower than 15 must now include a warning on the label stating that the product has been shown only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer or early skin aging.

Broad spectrum sunscreens: Sunscreen products can only be labeled "broad spectrum" if they have been tested and shown to protect against both UVA and UVB rays. Some of the chemicals in sunscreens that help protect against UVA rays include avobenzone (Parsol 1789), ecamsule, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide.

Only broad spectrum sunscreen products with an SPF of 15 or higher can state that they help protect against skin cancer and early skin aging if use as directed with other sun protection measures (as discussed last week).

Water resistant sunscreen: Sunscreens are no longer allowed to be labeled as "waterproof" or "sweatproof" because these terms can be misleading. Sunscreens can claim to be "water resistant", but they have to state whether they protect the skin for 40 or 80 minutes of swimming, based on testing.

Expiration dates: Check the expiration date to be sure it's still effective. Most sunscreen products are good for at least 2-3 years, but you may need to shake the bottle to remix the ingredients. Sunscreens that have been exposed to heat for long periods may be less effective.

BE SURE TO APPLY THE SUNSCREEN PROPERLY

Always follow the label directions. Most recommend applying sunscreen generously. When putting it on, pay close attention to your face, ears, neck, arms and any other areas not covered by clothing. If you're going to wear insect repellant or makeup, put the sunscreen on first.

Ideally, about 1 ounce of sunscreen (about a shot glass or palmful) should be used to cover the arms, legs, neck and face of the average adult. Sunscreens needs to be reapplied at least every 2 hours to maintain protection. Sunscreens can wash off when you swim and/or sweat and then wipe off with a towel, so they might have to be reapplied more often. Be sure to read the label. And don't forget your lips, lip balm with sunscreen is also available.

I hope the information shared this month helps you enjoy the sun a little more safely!!

New topic next month!!

 

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People who get a lot of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays are at greater risk for skin cancer and eye problems.

Sunlight is the main source of UV rays, but you don't have to avoid the sun completely. Physical activity is important for good health, so you don't want to stay inside all the time. But getting too much sun can be harmful. You have to have balance and take steps to limit your exposure to UV rays.

Some people think about sun protection only when they spend a day at the lake, beach or pool. But sun exposure adds up day after day, and it happens every time you are in the sun.

Simply staying in the shade is one of the best ways to limit your UV exposure. if you are going to be in the sun, "Slip!" "Slop!" "Slap!" and "Wrap!" is a catchphrase that can help you remember some of the steps you can take to protect yourself from UV rays: slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen, slap on a hat, wrap on sunglasses to protect the eyes and skin around them.

SEEK SHADE

Seeking shade here in the desert is a challenge! Avoid being outdoors in direct sunlight too long, especially between the hours of 11Am and 2pm when UV light is strongest. UV rays can also reach below the water's surface, so you can still get a burn even if you're in the water and feeling cool.

Some UV rays can also pass through windows. Typical car windows block most UVB rays but a smaller portion of UVA rays. Tinted windows help block more UVA rays. If you spend a lot of time in your car, it would be wise to apply sunscreen, especially to left arm for driver for protection.

PROTECT YOUR SKIN WITH CLOTHING

When you are out in the sun, wear clothing to cover as much skin as possible. Most protective are long-sleeved shirts and long pants as they cover the most skin. Dark colors generally provide more protection then light colors.

Some companies now make clothing that's lightweight, comfortable, and protects against UV exposure. These sun-protective clothes may have a label listing the UV protection factor (UPF) value. The higher the UPF, the higher the protection from UV rays.

WEAR A HAT

A hat with at least a 2-3" brim all around is ideal because it protects areas that are often exposed to intense sun, such as the ears, eyes, forehead, nose and scalp. A shade cap (which looks like a baseball cap with about 7" of fabric draping down the side and back) also is good, and will provide more protection for the neck.

WEAR SUNGLASSES THAT BLOCK UV RAYS

UV-blocking sunglasses are important for protecting the delicate skin around the eyes, as well as the eyes themselves.

The ideal sunglasses should block 99%-100% of UVA and UVB rays. Before you buy, check the label to make sure they do. Labels that say "UV absorption up to 400nm" or "Meets ANSI requirements" means the glasses block at least 99% of rays, Those labeled "cosmetic" block about 70% of UV rays. If there is no label, don't assume the sunglasses provide any UV protection.

Hope I provided you with some useful information. Next week: all about sunscreen!

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