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Vision loss can cause your world to become a frightening place, especially if it is caused by a sudden, traumatic event.  Your once simple, seemingly mundane life has been turned around.

*Tasks you had previously completed with ease, are now much more complicated.

*Family members will want to keep you safe and protected, but this can often lead to smothering.  Those with vision loss should be encouraged to become independent once again.  This will help the person with the vision loss as well as the family member.  Often times, family members caring for an aging, sick or visually impaired loved one can become overwhelmed with the responsibility.

*This is when a qualified caregiver can come in to relieve the stress of the family members, while at the same time allow their loved one to regain some of that independence which was lost.  At ElderCaring, we can connect you with a caregiver to do just that.  Our caregivers can help with light housework, personal hygiene, laundry, meal planning and preparation, organization, escort to doctor’s appointments, and much more.  When dealing with someone who has recent vision loss, it can feel like a monumental task to organize each area of the home for ease and safety.  Our caregivers can help organize closets, pantries, cupboards, bathrooms, etc. to make it easier for those with vision loss to find what they need when they are alone.  This will give them greater independence.  We also provide live-in assistance if you feel you loved one needs around-the-clock care. This may be a short-term option for those with very recent vision loss until they regain some independence.  You can easily transition from 24 hour assistance to fewer hours as needed.  Whatever your need, know you are not alone in this.  ElderCaring will be there with a screened, qualified caregiver for as long as needed.

Questions to ask yourself if you or your loved one are dealing with vision loss:

Are you feeling overwhelmed and not sure what to do?

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the responsibility of taking care of your loved one experiencing vision loss?

If you answered yes to either of these questions then you could definitely benefit from the support of an in-home caregiver backed by the top agency servicing Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Indio, Indian Wells and Cathedral City. Get the support you need now before your health becomes an issue, because you need to be healthy in order to be there for your loved ones who depend upon you for help.

Isn't it time you called today to get that long awaited and much needed help?

Call us today for a free, no-obligation home assessment.

 

For some helpful information on vision and brain injury, here is a link to an article written by Thomas Politzer, O.D.  Former President of the Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation Association:

Introduction to Vision & Brain Injury

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Posted by on in Caregiving

As your loved one prepares to come home from the hospital or rehabilitation center, there are some things you can do to ease that transition.

DISCHARGE PLANNING: should start on day one of admission to the facility--not on the day prior to or of discharge. It involves a team of health-related disciplines coordinated by a case manager or discharge planner. Family involvement is a must. It should include an assessment of your loved one's living environment, family and caregiver support and disability benefits.

GOALS OF DISCHARGE PLANNING: Making sure your loved one has a safe place to live; deciding what care, assistance or special equipment will be needed; teaching you the needed skills to provide your loved one with daily care and assistance at home; arranging follow-up care with health care provider(s).

HAVING A FRIENDLY LIVING PLACE: Many stroke survivors can return to their own home. Others may need to live in a nursing home or assisted living facility. The choice depends on your loved one's needs for care and whether caregivers are available in the home. Most importantly--that it is a safe environment!

Prior to your loved one returning home--a home visit should be performed. Suggestions may be made to make home safer, such as rearranging rooms to avoid use of stairs, moving throw rugs or small pieces of furniture that could cause falls, placing grab bars and seats in tubs and showers.

*It is also a good idea for your  loved one to go home for  a trial visit before discharge. this will help identify problems that need to be corrected before he/she returns.  *

ADJUSTING TO THE CHANGE: Returning home after a stroke is a big adjustment for patient, family members and other caregivers involved in the care. It may be a challenge to transfer the new skills learned to the home environment. You will discover how the stroke will affect your daily lives and what adjustments are needed both physical and emotional.

As a caregiver, you may have many new responsibilities and you'll have to be prepared to deal with the stress that comes with them. Even when family and friends help, conflicts over care giving issues can cause pressure. Learning to deal with this stress is an important part of keeping yourself healthy.

*Remember that you need support, understanding and some time to rest too!*

We at ElderCaring can provide home care assistance!

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When your loved one suffers a stroke, you may have a lot of questions about whether your loved one will recover and what his/her needs will be in the months and years ahead. It can be overwhelming.

Here are some tips that can help you balance the needs of the stroke survivor with your own health and happiness. In the first weeks after a stroke, you'll have a lot to learn and assess as you look to the future.

EDUCATE YOURSELF: There can be a lot to learn, so take advantage of every opportunity to learn about stroke and your loved one's condition and prognosis. Take part in support groups or programs that are offered by the hospital and/or rehabilitation center. Talk with the health care team about what the stroke recovery and rehabilitation process will be.

LOOK INTO INSURANCE/FINANCES: Medicare and/or health insurance will cover most of the hospitalization expenses. There may be restrictions on which facilities and providers are covered. Be sure to find out exactly what is covered and what out-of-pocket payments may be needed. Also, remember, that as your loved one gains abilities or is no longer progressing, coverage may change or stop. A Social Worker or Case Manager may be able to assist you in these insurance issues.

STROKE REHABILITATION: Attend a few therapy sessions so that you can support your loved one during the recovery process. Be supportive and allow survivors to do things for themselves. It may take them longer to accomplish a task but once done- will help them become more self-reliant and confident!

ASSESS NEEDS WITH ABILITY TO MEET THEM: Your loved one's health care team can help you determine what kind of help will be needed. Caregivers often need to: provide personal care such as bathing and dressing; coordinate health care needs including medications and appointments (both doctor and rehab); manage finances and insurance; help the survivor maintain and increase his/her ability to function. Remember you can't do everything!! Be realistic about what you can take on and what you may need help with.  ElderCaring can provide skilled caregivers!!!

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Parkinson's Disease can eventually lead to slow or delayed balance responses. Your doctor may recommend a Home Safety Evaluation where an Occupational Therapist comes to the home and provides tips to make your home safer.

This week we will list some safety tips for various rooms in your home. Hope you find some of these helpful!

One safety challenge many patients with advance Parkinson's face is "freezing". Freezing is the temporary, involuntary inability to move. There is no known cause and the episodes are unpredictable. Here are some tips for patients to try to help alleviate a "freezing" episode: marching, shifting weight of body from one leg to another, listening to rhythmical music and stepping with the rhythm, using a mobile laser device that creates a line in front of them to step over.

BATHROOM  SAFETY TIPS: Most falls take place in the bathroom because of difficulty getting on/off the toilet; in/out of tub; difficulty seeing due to lighting issues;slipping on wet surfaces; tripping on throw rugs or dizziness. Here are some tips: Use of bath bench or shower chair. Elevated toilet seat. Grab bars and/or tub rail. Hand held shower. Lower heat of water to prevent burns. Light switch near door--always put light on before entering room. Use of nightlight. Rubber mat and/or non-skid decals in bath/shower. Make sure all throw rugs have intact rubber backing.

KITCHEN SAFETY TIPS: Use longer cabinet handles versus knobs as handles make it easier to open/close doors. Install sliding drawers to avoid need to reach or bend over too far to look in back of drawers. Use a single handle faucet as easier to control and turn on/off. Place frequently used items for cooking within easy reach. Make sure a smoke alarm is in working order.

BEDROOM SAFETY TIPS: Make sure your bed is easy to get in and out of in terms of height-average height is 22 inches. Consider use of bedside commode and/or urinal if bathroom not close. Make clothing accessible: clothing rods should be at height that is easy to reach. Store clothing in drawers that will allow access without stooping/bending. Carpets should be smooth to create a safe walking surface. Adequate lighting: keep flashlight available in case of power outage; lamps and/or light switches near bed to avoid having to walk in dark; nightlight. Have telephone and clock near bedside.

LIVING ROOM SAFETY TIPS: Make sure all furniture is secure, sturdy and does not swivel. Have adequate lighting. Adequate space to move around furniture. Adjustable blinds/shades to regulate glare. Room free of clutter to prevent a fall. All cords are out of the flow of foot traffic.

STAIRWAY SAFETY TIPS: Provide adequate lighting. Apply brightly colored tape to the top and bottom step to show beginning and end of steps. Apply non-skid surface to steps. Install a ramp over stairs if unable to safely climb steps. Install hand rails on at least one side of steps. Keep step clutter free.

Living with Parkinson's is a challenge for patient, family, friends and caregivers. I hope we have provided some useful information to you this month. Please feel free to contact us if we can provide assistance.

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Posted by on in Caregiving

You start to notice little things when you visit your parents...the kitchen hasn't been cleaned for days,  you aren't sure if they are taking their medicine, and the scariest...once the stove was still on.  Maybe they need some help. Or maybe you already spend a lot of time helping them and you need a break.  In-home care could really give you some peace-of-mind.  However, you may be hesitant because you think you can't afford it.  Fortunately, there are many levels of home care and it may be more affordable than you think.  

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