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Some Facts about Breast Cancer in the United States

 

  • One in eight women in the United States will be Diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.
  • Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and more than 40,000 will die.
  • Although breast cancer in males is rare, an estimated 2,600 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and approximately 440 will die each year.
  • About every 2 minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer and 1 woman will die of breast cancer every 13 minutes.
  • More than 2.8 million breast cancer survivors are alive in the United States today.
  • Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women.
  • Each year it is estimated that over 246,660 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer
  • Exercise reduces breast cancer risk for women of all body types – even lean women, according to Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., director of cancer etiology at City of Hope.

 

Did YOU know??

 

Another top risk factor for breast cancer is getting older? YES.  – 79 percent of new cases and 88 percent of deaths occurred in women age 50 and older; according to the American Cancer Society fewer than 11,000 cases occurred in women younger than 40, and just under 49,000 in women under 50. In women ages 50 to 64, breast cancer was even more common with more than 84,000 cases. Women over age 65 accounted for more than 99,000 cases last year.

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Posted by on in Senior Health

 

 

Tips on communicating with the elderly

As people grow older, they become more difficult to understand and even changes in their environment can have an impact on their communication. Many Elderly and disabled people struggle with hearing, reading and writing, General communications skills.  Many elderly or disabled people have short-term memory loss so a conversation that you may have just had with them is one they can easily forget.  Lots of patients and compassion is key.

 

Here are some ways to help your communication with a loved one who is elderly or disabled.

 

  • Maintain eye contact and speak clearly and directly to them (Loud tone if hearing is an issue)
  • Be as simple as possible (small words, short sentences, and visual aids).
  • Try not to argue with the elder it may over excite them or upset them.
  • Recall what you are stating to the elder (restate key ideas of the topic frequently/ repeat key points)
  • Exercise patients and compassion
  • Ask instead of order and demand
  • Ask instead of assuming
  • Offer choices when possible
  • Use “I” instead of “YOU” People do not like to be demanded. It may cause them to be upset.

 

Examples:

“You must exercise today!”

“You need to finish your soup”

Instead use the “I” language

“I will help you exercise today!”

“Let’s finish your soup, Okay?”

 

 

 

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Posted by on in Senior Health

Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection that has spread by way of the bloodstream. It is caused by an immune reaction triggered by an infection, most commonly from a bacteria. Sepsis can occur from any kind of infection, even a minor one. Because sepsis is caused by an infection, the symptoms can include regular infection signs as well as:

  • A fever above 101.3 F
  • Extreme pain or discomfort
  • Increased heart rate (higher than 90 beats a minute)
  • Sleepiness or confusion
  • Shortness of breath (higher than 20 breaths a minute)

Anyone can develop sepsis, but it's most common and most dangerous in older adults or those with weakened immune systems. Sepsis can progress to septic shock and death if it is not treated quickly. The earlier sepsis is diagnosed and treated, the more likely you are to survive. If you are continuing to feel worse or not getting better after you have had surgery, it is important that you tell your doctor that you are concerned about sepsis. People hospitalized for other reasons often develop sepsis as a secondary complication. Doctors usually treat people with sepsis in the hospital with antibiotics as soon as possible. Many people who have suffered with sepsis completely recover and return to life as usual. Unfortunately, some people may experience permanent damage to their organs. It is important to see your doctor if you think you may have developed sepsis. In an effort to prevent sepsis, you should clean any cuts, scrapes and wounds well, and practice good hygiene such as washing your hands and bathing regularly. If you have developed an infection, watch for the signs of sepsis.

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Posted by on in Lifestyle and Wellness

This month attention is given to safety!

By bringing awareness to safety issues we hope to prevent injuries and accidental deaths. It's time to repair broken steps and/or handrails, clean out medicine cabinet (reviewed earlier this month) and install lighting in dim hallways.

Here are some general tips to protect against accidental falls and promote safety:

Aisles, stairs and walkways should be clutter-free; spills should be wiped, dropped objects picked up and cabinet drawers closed when not in use.

Use handrails in stairways; take one step at a time and repair broken/loose stair coverings.

Apply non-skid floor coverings and slip-resistant mats where falls are likely. Slow down and take small steps when walking on a wet or slippery surface.

Wear proper footwear. Athletic shoes greatly reduce the risks of falls among the elderly. The risk of falling increases if in stocking feet or barefoot.

Store frequently used items in easy to reach areas.

Exercise regularly. The stronger the body, the more likely a person is to sustain a fall with minimal injury.

** GOAL IS SAFETY!!**

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